About Us


Hawksbury Community Living Trust provides community residential support services to support adults with intellectual disabilities to live in their community. The Trust provides homes with 24-hour (awake) staff support. Below is an example of some of the support people receive:

 

  • Shopping
  • Preparing and cooking meals
  • Household chores including gardening, lawn mowing and window cleaning
  • Personal support such as eating and drinking, taking a shower and dressing, accessing medical support
  • Getting out and doing things in the neighbourhood, eg: seeing a movie, visiting friends, swimming, attending church
  • Finances

 

The Trust provides a range of easily accessible homes, small or large. People have their own bedroom where they can have their own personal belongings.

 

Our homes are situated in pleasant neighborhoods and have paid staff to help people with their everyday activities and to find ways for them to take part in their local communities. This means creating and supporting peoples’ lifestyle choices within the community and promoting access to recreation, social and cultural opportunities.

 

Hawksbury aims to support people with intellectual disabilities and their family/whanau so the people we support can actively participate and be valued in all aspects of community life; this will be achieved through partnership and participation between their family, staff and Hawksbury Trust. We want the people we support to be valued neighbours and citizens.

 

History

Around 1985 the New Zealand Government of the day made a decision to close all institutions primarily set up in the 1930’s to care for people with an intellectual disability. From the early 1990’s community providers were established to transition people from institutional living to community care.

 

Hawksbury Community Living Trust was established in 1990 by a group of parents from Cherry Farm Hospital, staff and the manager of the Cherry Farm Hospital. The Trust began providing support in the community on 13 April 1992 when they opened their first home in Middleton Road Dunedin. Fifteen people made the move from Cherry Farm to Middleton Road. By the end of 1996 the Trust was supporting 50 people over four homes in Dunedin. The majority of these people had moved from Cherry Farm with the last few people coming from an Intellectually Disabled Unit at Gore Hospital.

 

At the same time (1996) the Trust were considering a proposal to set up similar support in Christchurch for people who were to move from the Templeton Centre. In November 1996 this decision was confirmed. Between September 1997 and December 1999 the Trust resettled 75 people from Templeton Hospital.

 

The closure of Kimberley Hospital in Levin in 2005 completed the government’s aim to disestablish all institutions in New Zealand.

 

With the closure of all institutions the Trust then faced the prospect of supporting people who had never lived in an institution and were currently being supported at home with family. It was predicted people would not easily transition to homes with sometimes up to 10-15 other flat mates. This prompted the Trust to begin reviewing what was offered and how support could be offered differently. Hawksbury began looking at the current homes and where possible smaller homes or flats were created. This has enhanced the Trust’s vision of providing a variety of high quality accommodation options for people.

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